Helicopter vs Free-Range Parenting

 

Helicopter vs Free-Range Parenting

            Play is essential for a child’s physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. Play helps nurture imagination and creativity and helps children hone leadership skills. Unfortunately, today, play patterns have significantly changed with children playing under supervised conditions with scheduled activities. Instead of kids having the freedom to explore the geographic and social world, their parents or guardians are heavily invested in their play activities through formal events such as “play dates.” The change in play patterns can be attributed to a range of factors, including technological advances, increasing control by adults, increased child predators, and reduced play space. Today, kids spend more time watching TV or playing video games than playing with their peers. Additionally, parents exert more control over children as they try to instil discipline and bond with the children. Child predation has also increased and has cautioned patients against unsupervised play (Watchman and Spencer-Cavaliere, 2017). Also, due to population increase, play space has reduced as people try to create more housing and business facilities.

The change in play patterns has both short term and long-term effects on children. In the short-term, children suffer from obesity due to a lack of physical activities. In the long-term, children suffer from decreased brain and muscle development, reduced problem-solving, communication, and social skills (McQuade, McLaughlin, Giles, and CASSIDY, 2019).

My parents allowed me to play with other children, unsupervised and away from home. I developed effective social, problem-solving and communication skills. However, modern society requires that I parent my children in a “helicopter” manner. I will try to get my children to interact with others in a supervised environment to ensure they do not pick up negative perceptions. Also, this will ensure that my children participate in positive activities rather than negative ones.

 

References

McQuade, L., McLaughlin, M., Giles, M., & CASSIDY, T. (2019). Play Across the Generations: Perceptions of Changed play Patterns in Childhood: Play Across the Generations. Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities5(2), 90-96. [2]

Watchman, T., & Spencer-Cavaliere, N. (2017). Times have changed: Parent perspectives on children’s free play and sport. Psychology of Sport and Exercise32, 102-112.


 

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