purpose and goal of educational institution

Introduction

The purpose and goal of any educational institution is to introduce and instil set of knowledge and skills to the students and together with the parents and/or guardians act as the custodians of personal development through discovering and nurturing talents. A given education institutions will have students from all economic, social and cultural divides; students talented differently, with different perspectives on the education and learning systems and with different post-school aspirations, and it’s the work of the institution and relevant stakeholders (Joyce, 2011) to match these traits to help them achieve maximum in school life. These students may explicitly and/or implicitly depict or showcase their attributes in that some are physically active in both the academic and extra curriculum activities whereas others may be passive in any of them or both (Rayner & Cools, 2011). This will in one way or the other influence their academic performance and personal growth and development both at the college and after college which are similar but different to some extent and this paper seeks to contrast the academic performance, leadership/ administrative roles and post-school lives of active and passive students.

Academically, preparing and developing the cognitive aspects of a student is the goal of every institution and in most cases, institutions will compete with each other in a bid to provide the cutting edge skills and expertise to their students. Active students seem to be brighter than passive students in that they tend to grasp and comprehend phenomenon faster and easier than passive students. This can be attributed to the fact that their involvement in the extra curriculum activities relaxes their minds opening up for cognitive processes (Eysenck, 2012) in that they can learn and memorize concepts whenever in class. In cases of difficulties to understand a topic/concept, active students can use their interactive acumen to seek and gather assistance from their peers; making it easier for comprehension compared to their counterparts.  It should also be noted that passive students are good in comprehending phenomenon but the speed of assimilating these concepts in their minds an application tends to be slower; comparatively making active students to have credit on that. In addition, passive students are more reflective in the answers they provide more so in the narrative subjects such as creative writing compared to active student; a factor that can be pegged on ample time they have in designing and implementing different perspectives of a phenomenon or subject compared to active students who might always be in a rush to implement and apply the concepts.

Apart from ensuring students cognitively understand the subject matter; institutions are also interested to ensure that graduates can make good leaders, an attributed nurtured within the institution. Active students tend are involved in leadership roles to a greater extent than the passive students but comparatively lack administrative skills; a factor that can be attributed to rationality and perceptions between these students (Scherer, 2010). For instance, an active student will have several friends and good communication skills to help him/her gather more votes in an elective position compared to a passive student; who in most cases are introverts but with great administrative skills. Passive students will always have time and reflective skills to study and analyse their subject giving them an upper hand in the administrative roles compared to active students who have little time with their subject due to their tight programs. In addition, as active students seem to be more convincing due to their communication acumen; their leadership spans are short-lived due to their inability to harmonize the subjects, an attribute pegged on lack of information and knowledge about their subjects compared to the passive students. Individually, passive students are personable problem solvers compared to their counterparts; a factor that can be pegged on their holistic understanding of the human issues and their ability critically matches their needs with available alternatives.

The availability of different subjects and disciplines of study in institutions are designed to prepare students for different roles and expertise in various areas and aspects in society. In the job market, active students tend to be assimilated faster by firms due to their outspoken attitude and perceptions compared to passive students. Passive students, on the other hand, seem to be the top scorers during interviews compared to active students more so in managerial and back-office opportunities; an attribute that can be pegged on their reflective and considerate traits they possess compared to their counterparts (Woerkom &Poell, 2010). The ability to make friends and conviction traits associated with active students gives them a competitive advantage in fields such as sales and marketing and politics; fields that passive student might face difficulties to pursue due to his personality and/or perception, factors that can be attributed to his/her process of growth and development, in and after school.

Conclusion

Academic performance and personal growth and development are key issues that institutions seek to address; goals and objectives to help students, active and passive, pursue their personal goals and despite active students being seen as having an upper hand in the discussed perspectives, the impacts and contributions of the passive students should not be ignored.

References

Eysenck, M. W. (2012). Fundamentals of cognition. Hove, East Sussex: Psychology Press.

Joyce, P. (2011). Policing: Development & contemporary practice. London: SAGE.

Scherer, M. (2010). Keeping the whole child healthy and safe: Reflections on best practices in learning, teaching, and leadership. Alexandria, Va: ASCD.

Woerkom, M. V., & Poell, R. F. (2010). Workplace learning: Concepts, measurement, and application. New York: Routledge.

Rayner, S., & Cools, E. (2011). Style differences in cognition, learning, and management: Theory, research, and practice. New York: Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparative-Contrast Essay-Active and Passive Student

 

 

 

Name:

 

Institution:

 

Course:

 

Tutor:

 

Date:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The purpose and goal of any education institution is to introduce and instil set of knowledge and skills to the students and together with the parents and/or guardians act as the custodians of personal development through discovering and nurturing talents. A given education institutions will have students from all economic, social and cultural divides; students talented differently, with different perspectives on the education and learning systems and with different post-school aspirations, and it’s the work of the institution and relevant stakeholders (Joyce, 2011) to match these traits to help them achieve maximum in school life. These students may explicitly and/or implicitly depict or showcase their attributes in that some are physically active in both the academic and extra curriculum activities whereas others may be passive in any of them or both (Rayner & Cools, 2011). This will in one way or the other influence their academic performance and personal growth and development both at the college and after college which are similar but different to some extent and this paper seeks to contrast the academic performance, leadership/ administrative roles and post school lives of active and passive students.

Academically, preparing and developing the cognitive aspects of a student is the goal of every institution and in most cases institutions will compete with each other in a bid to provide the cutting edge skills and expertise to their students. Active students seem to be brighter than passive students in that they tend to grasp and comprehend phenomenon faster and easier than passive students. This can be attributed to the fact that their involvement in the extra curriculum activities relaxes their minds opening up for cognitive processes (Eysenck, 2012) in that they can learn and memorize concepts whenever in class. In cases of difficulties to understand a topic/concept, active students can use their interactive acumen to seek and gather assistance from their pears; making it easier for comprehension compared to their counterparts.  It should also be noted that passive students are good in comprehending phenomenon but the speed of assimilating these concepts in their minds an applications tends to be slower; comparatively making active students to have credit on that. In addition, passive students are more reflective in the answers they provide more so in the narrative subjects such as creative writing compared to active student; a factor that can be pegged on ample time they have in designing and implementing different perspectives of a phenomenon or subject compared to active students who might always be in a rush to implement and apply the concepts.

Apart from ensuring students cognitively understand the subject matter; institutions are also interested to ensuring that graduates can make good leaders, an attributed nurtured within the institution. Active students tend are involved in leadership roles to a greater extent than the passive students but comparatively lack administrative skills; a factor that can be attributed to rationality and perceptions between these students (Scherer, 2010). For instance, an active student will have several friends and good communication skills to help him/her gather more votes in an elective position compared to a passive student; who in most cases are introverts but with great administrative skills. Passive students will always have time and reflective skills to study and analyse their subject giving them an upper hand in the administrative roles compared to active students who have little time with their subject due to their tight programs. In addition, as active students seem to be more convincing due to their communication acumen; their leadership spans are short lived due to their inability to harmonize the subjects, an attribute pegged on lack of information and knowledge about their subjects compared to the passive students. Individually, passive students are personable problem solvers compared to their counterparts; a factor that can be pegged on their holistic understanding of the human issues and their ability critically matches their needs with available alternatives.

The availability of different subjects and disciplines of study in institutions are designed to prepare students for different roles and expertise in various areas and aspects in the society. In the job market, active students tend to be assimilated faster by firms due to their outspoken attitude and perceptions compared to passive students. Passive students on the other hand, seem to be the top scorers during interviews compared to active students more so in managerial and back office opportunities; an attribute that can be pegged on their reflective and considerate traits they possess compared to their counterparts (Woerkom &Poell, 2010). The ability to make friends and conviction traits associated with active students gives them a competitive advantage in fields such as sales and marketing and politics; fields that passive student might face difficulties to pursue due to his personality and/or perception, factors that can be attributed to his/her process of growth and development, in and after school.

Conclusion

Academic performance and personal growth and development are key issues that institutions seek to address; goals and objectives to help students, active and passive, pursue their personal goals and despite active students being seen as having an upper hand in the discussed perspectives, the impacts and contributions of the passive students should not be ignored.

 

 

References

Eysenck, M. W. (2012). Fundamentals of cognition. Hove, East Sussex: Psychology Press.

Joyce, P. (2011). Policing: Development & contemporary practice. London: SAGE.

Scherer, M. (2010). Keeping the whole child healthy and safe: Reflections on best practices in learning, teaching, and leadership. Alexandria, Va: ASCD.

Woerkom, M. V., & Poell, R. F. (2010). Workplace learning: Concepts, measurement, and application. New York: Routledge.

Rayner, S., & Cools, E. (2011). Style differences in cognition, learning, and management: Theory, research, and practice. New York: Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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